Whether you work in an office, a factory, a field, a hospital, or anything in between, there is a good chance that you put a lot of weight and stress on your feet every day. It is not always the back, stress can manifest itself in the other parts of our body too. People often opt for massages, so it makes sense that there should be foot massages too, right? Reflexology is much more than a foot massage, but at its foundation, that’s the easiest way to describe the process. This specific area of massage therapy also includes hands and ears, making it a holistic massage.
Practice applying pressure to reflex points. When you identify which zone you want to engage, find the correct reflex spots on your foot by looking on a chart or consulting with a reflexologist. Apply gentle pressure to the area. The pressure you apply to these spots will stimulate your body to create endorphins that interrupt the pain cycle and relieve stress.
There is absolutely a time and a place for DTM, the problem is that everyone has a different idea of what this means. Some therapists go after deep fascial layers, some therapists think this means trigger point work, and some just increase pressure as much as they can. If the client and therapist don’t have an open dialogue with clear instructions of when ‘enough is enough’, the client can experience a lot of discomfort and we don’t want that.

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In 2015 the Australian Government's Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies that sought to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance; reflexology was one of 17 therapies evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.[5] Accordingly In 2017 the Australian government named reflexology as a practice that would not qualify for insurance subsidy, saying this step would "ensure taxpayer funds are expended appropriately and not directed to therapies lacking evidence".[6]
Rotation on a point. You're going to also use that thumb walking and you're just going to rotate the foot. So, it's right under the metatarsal heads, you come down and you just rotate over. I am actually going to walk the, what is called the diaphragm line. So, you go in and you're just going to rotate there. You can go over the entire diaphragm line.
While the majority of people tend to get professional reflexology sessions for their feet, the hands can be just as effective. In the self-help reflexology segment I did on the show, I explained what to look for on your palms to get to know your own body better. Here’s a recap for you to try for yourself. Of course, this is not a substitute for medical care; always be sure to consult with the appropriate health practitioner in case of any medical condition.
As for the commonly held belief that extra liquids are needed post-massage: that’s a myth, explains Gammal. “Massage does not release or flush out any toxins from the body, which means it won’t dehydrate you. Massage helps with recovery from lactic acid but doesn’t get rid of lactic acid.” Post-massage, you can just resume your normal hydration habits.
Reflexology in Thailand is abundantly offered even at spas, centres, markets, and chair beside the street because it is widely known as one of the most relaxing therapies. Colorado School of Thai Massage offers a short course of reflexology about the fundamental practice of Thai Foot Reflexology. For those who are interested, no bodywork experience required to join this course.

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